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Wednesday, 09 March

01:03

Who’s Gonna Build Your Wall? Video Goes Viral in Texas Indian Country Headline News

“It’s a pyramid scheme, a dirty job – who’s going to build your wall”?...

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Tuesday, 08 March

21:25

Survival calls for end to Botswana’s Bushman "apartheid” News from Survival International

Most Bushmen are still forced to live in government resettlement camps, rather than on their land in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve
Most Bushmen are still forced to live in government resettlement camps, rather than on their land in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve
© Dominick Tyler

Survival International has launched a campaign calling for an end to a draconian system in Botswana which has broken Bushmen families apart and denied them access to their land. Critics such as veteran anti-apartheid activist Michael Dingake have compared the system to the apartheid-era pass laws.

The call comes in the fiftieth anniversary year of Botswana’s independence.

After having been brutally evicted and forced into government camps between 1997 and 2002, the Bushmen won a historic court victory in 2006 recognizing their right to live on their land in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve.

Since then, however, this...

13:17

Women of the Amazon Defend Their Homeland Against New Oil Contract on International Women's Day Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Women of the Amazon Defend Their Homeland Against New Oil Contract on International Women's Day: [ecowatch.com] -- At the forefront of this ongoing struggle are courageous Indigenous Amazonian women leaders who have declared, “We are ready to protect, defend and die for our forest, families, territory and nation.”

In marches, protests, conferences and international forums, the women of the Ecuadorian Amazon are standing with fierce love and conviction for the forests and their communities, and navigating a brutal intersection of environmental devastation, cultural dislocation and violence and persecution as women human rights and land defenders.

The women have repeatedly put their bodies on the frontline in an attempt to halt oil extraction across the Amazon, often facing harsh repression by the state security.

“Women are the main victims [of oil extrction]—their ability to feed their families becomes impaired. There is deterioration of family health and they suffer the division of their communities and other forms of violence,” women representatives of the Sapara and Shiwiar Nationalities and the Kichwa Kawsak Sacha and Sarayaku Peoples explained in a collective statement.

11:49

Unarmed Native Woman Murdered by Tacoma Police: Justice for Jaqueline Salyers Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Unarmed Native Woman Murdered by Tacoma Police: Justice for Jaqueline Salyers: -- [revcom.us] -- News photographs of the car show bullet holes in the passenger side of the front windshield, both driver and passenger side windows shattered, and a bullet exit hole in the driver-side door. If the car was actually coming at a cop standing in front of it and in danger of being run over, the cop would have fired at the driver, and the bullet holes would be in the driver’s side of the front windshield. The holes being on the passenger side front windshield instead indicates that cop was standing ahead of, but off to the side of, the car (and so not in danger of being hit by the car), so that the bullet entered at the passenger side of the front windshield and angled across and hit Jackie Salyers and not Wright. Also, family members state that when dressing Jackie for burial, they found she was shot in the right side of the temple.

We’ve seen over and over again how cops claim they “feared for their lives” to justify murdering people. You can read at www.revcom.us, for example, two other cases where police claimed they were endangered by people in their cars and killed them—in two different cities in July last year: Samuel DuBose, a Black man murdered by Cincinnati cops, and Zachary Hammond, a white youth murdered by Seneca, South Carolina, police.

11:07

Prime Minister Trudeau Awarded Honorary Tsuut'ina Membership, Crowned With Headdress Indian Country Headline News

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s initial strides into office have been so promising that the Tsuut’ina Nation made him an honorary member and awarded him the name Gumistiyi, “The...

The Week That Was: The Big Stories in Indian Country, March 6, 2016 Indian Country Headline News

A tragic start to Women’s History Month, major wins and shout-outs for The Revenant and its indigenous actors, and bilingual street signs made their mark in Indian coun...

08:46

Georgia Bill Would Exempt Construction Projects From Reporting Sacred Remains Indian Country Headline News

There is a bill on the Georgia Assembly’s docket, SB 346 that would create exemptions for state transportation projects under $100 million from following Georgia...

White Swan-Perkins: Koshare Dancers and Their Wildly Offensive Cultural Appropriation Indian Country Headline News

To depend on a Boy Scout in times of trouble has been a long standing American tradition....

06:28

Berta Cáceres one of hundreds of land protesters murdered in last decade | Environment | The Guardian Aboriginal News Group Newswire

Berta Cáceres one of hundreds of land protesters murdered in last decade | Environment | The Guardian - “We are seeing an upsurge in the scramble for land and natural resources, which means more and more companies are encroaching further and further into the lands of indigenous people,” said Billy Kyte, from Global Witness.

Honduras is the most dangerous place to protest against developments, with more deaths per capita than any other country: 101 between 2010 and 2014, according to Global Witness’s report How Many More? At least three of Cáceres’s colleagues, also protesting against the Agua Zarca cascade of four giant hydropower dams, had been murdered previously. “They follow me. They threaten to kill me, to kidnap me, they threaten my family. That is what we face,” said Cáceres in 2014.

Brazil, South America’s biggest country and containing much of the vast Amazon rainforest, suffered the greatest death toll of people defending their lands and the environment, with at least 454 killings from 2002 to 2014. But the violence pre-dates the records assembled by Global Witness, with the infamous murder of Chico Mendes by a rancher occuring back in 1988.

06:16

‘No Diplomacy with a Hungry Lion’: Native Leaders Look Ahead for 2016 Indian Country Headline News

Last year, ICTMN asked then Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs Kevin K....

As Serious as Lead Poisoning: Hillary v. Bernie Indian Country Headline News

The sixth Democratic debate was not a terribly edifying exercise, although it was a Socratic dialogue compared to the m...

05:08

US Drone Strikes Kill 150 People in Somalia | News | teleSUR English Aboriginal News Group Newswire

US Drone Strikes Kill 150 People in Somalia | News | teleSUR English: A U.S. official told NBC that the group was conducting "some kind of ceremony" when it was attacked by unmanned U.S. drones.

Al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for a number of devastating attacks in the region. In April 2015, al-Shabab militants attacked the Garissa University College in Kenya, killing 148 people. A September 2013 attack on a shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, left 67 civilians dead.

03:26

Debbie Reese at Northern New Mexico College on March 9, 2016 American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL)

I'm looking forward to time I'll spend with students in the P'ôe Project at Northern New Mexico College. If you're nearby, I hope you'll come! My goal in this lecture is to talk about what children are taught in schools. In textbooks and in children's literature, we tend to see the same problems: factual errors, bias, erasures, and missed opportunities, too. 



Take, for example, a very popular series called Geronimo Stilton. One of them is in Scholastic's Arrow (4th-6th grade) flyer for February 2016. The book is Geronimo Stilton's Race Across America. It is a good example of erasure.

In it, Geronimo visits Arizona. Those of you with knowledge of Native people know there are a lot of Native people in Arizona, but there aren't any in Race Across America.

I understand that it might have not fit with the story to include Navajo people for Geronimo to interact with when he's on Navajo lands, but throughout the book, there are pages that provide information that doesn't have much to do with the story. In Race Across America, Geronimo and his bike racing team fly to the West Coast aboard a large plane. In that part of the story, there's a page about exercises anyone can do to stretch their limbs when flying. You see these exercises in the airline magazines. They're the kind people should do to avoid thrombosis....

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Thursday, 11 February

22:20

Paraguay: Government ordered to protect uncontacted tribe News from Survival International

Contact with the outside world has been a very traumatic experience for many Ayoreo, exposing them to life-threatening diseases
Contact with the outside world has been a very traumatic experience for many Ayoreo, exposing them to life-threatening diseases
© Survival

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has ordered Paraguay’s government to protect an uncontacted tribe from being wiped out.

In a highly unusual decision, the Commission, part of the OAS, has demanded that the authorities intervene to stop cattle ranchers illegally destroying the Paraguayan Chaco, a uniquely biodiverse area that is home to the last uncontacted Indians outside the Amazon.

The area suffers the highest rate of deforestation in the world.* It is estimated that over 14 million trees are being cut down there every month.

The tribe, known as the Ayoreo-Totobiegosode are under severe threat from ranchers, who have rapidly destroyed their land and forced many of them out of their forest, where they are dying from a mysterious TB-like illness.

One Ayoreo told Survival: “Our relatives came out of the forest...

Thursday, 04 February

22:51

Paraguay's Indians see 14 million trees cut down in one month News from Survival International

Eroi was forced out of his forest in 1986. He was a shaman, but he stopped because the missionaries told him that shamanism was the work of the devil.
Eroi was forced out of his forest in 1986. He was a shaman, but he stopped because the missionaries told him that shamanism was the work of the devil.
© Gerald Henzinger/Survival

A new report has revealed that 14 million trees were cut down in just one month in the Paraguayan Chaco.

The Chaco is home to Paraguay’s most vulnerable tribe, the Ayoreo, and is the largest South American forest outside the Amazon. Scientists have called it one of the most biodiverse places on earth.

The report by Guyra, a Paraguayan environmental organization, shows that 28,000 hectares were cut down in October. The Chaco is currently facing the fastest rate of deforestation in the world.*

Part of this land belongs to the Ayoreo, who have been forced out of their forest home by cattle ranchers. Cattle firms...

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