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IndyWatch First People News Feed was generated at Australian News IndyWatch.

Friday, 12 February

03:48

Tribal Housing Needs Far Outstrip Federal Allocations Indian Country Headline News

The extra $50 million the Obama Administration wants to go towards tribal housing in fiscal 2017 looks to be just a dro...

01:49

THE CROW'S TALE by Naomi Howarth American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL)

The Crow's Tale by Naomi Howarth came out last year (2015) from Frances Lincoln Children's Books. That's a publisher in London.

The complete title of Howarth's book is The Crow's Tale: A Lenni Lenape Native American Legend. 

In her "About the story" note, Howarth writes:

The Rainbow Crow -- a Pennsylvania Lenni Lenape Indian legend--is the perfect example of a story that was first told to explain the mysteries of the natural world. When I came across this beautiful tale, my imagination was immediately soaring with Rainbow Crow across wide winter skies and landscapes. The tale has been passed down through generations of Lenni Lenape Indians, mostly orally, and I have tried to remain true to the narrative, although I have visualized the Creator as the Sun, as I wanted to make the Sun a character in his own right.

On her website page for the book, I see this:
Inspired by a Lenape Native American myth, this beautiful debut picture book shows how courage and kindness are what really matter.

Yes, courage and kindness matter, but so do other things. Clearly Howarth felt that she was doing a good thing with this story.

I have several questions.

What is the source Howarth used for this story? She doesn't tell us, which means we can't tell if her source is legitimate, or, if it is amongst the too-many-made-up stories attributed to Native peoples. Without that information, teachers are in a bind. Can they use this book to teach students about Lenni Lenape people and culture?

Is Howarth's story a Lenni Lenape one if she changed a key part of it? She tells us that she visualized Creator as the sun. Could she (or anyone) do that--say--with the Christian God and still call that story a Christian one? Maybe, but I think most people would say that doing so would be tampering with a reli...

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Thursday, 11 February

22:43

Evangeline Parsons-Yazzie on Winning the American Indian Library Association's 2016 Youth Literature Honor Award for Young Adults American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL)

I'm pleased to share Evangeline Parsons-Yazzie's response to the news that Her Land, Her Love had been selected by the American Indian Library Association for one of its honors.

~~~~~

Evangeline said:

On Friday February 5th, when I was first told by my publisher, Eric Lockard of Salina Bookshelf, Inc., that my novel had been selected by the American Indian Library Association as an Honor Book in the Young Adult category, I held my breath and asked Eric to repeat the news to me.  I wanted to hear the news several more times but my memory has been doing that for me.  

A heart-felt appreciation and deep gratitude is what I feel toward the awards committee who selected my novel, Her Land, Her Love as an Honor Book. I am still in awe of the the beautiful blessing that the people on the commit...

13:45

A Comprehensive Report on MMIW: The Curiously Different Tales of Violence against Indigenous Women On Both Sides of Turtle Island Indian Country Headline News

Editor’s Note: Though the figures are not definite, currently there are an estimated 1,200 Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women in Canada....

07:23

Cop Shoots, Kills Native Woman; Family Disputes Police Version Indian Country Headline News

A Tacoma police officer fatally shot Puyallup tribal member Jacqueline Salyers just before midnight on January 28....

Juneau: And the Campaign Goes On Indian Country Headline News

TRAHANT REPORTS – Denise Juneau, Montana’s superintendent of pu...

'It's Really a Joy to Be Alive,' Says Native American Victim of Hit-and-Run Indian Country Headline News

On January 25, 2015, powwow dancer Isaac Wak Wak’s life changed forever....

04:48

Across the Board Increases for Obama’s Indian Country Budget Indian Country Headline News

President Barack Obama submitted his Fiscal Year 2017 proposal to Congress yesterday, and the budget has increased fund...

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Wednesday, 10 February

21:39

Survival International accuses WWF of involvement in violence and abuse News from Survival International

Forced out of the forest, many Baka communities complain of a serious decline in their health. Living on the roadside, they are increasingly exposed to malaria and other diseases.
Forced out of the forest, many Baka communities complain of a serious decline in their health. Living on the roadside, they are increasingly exposed to malaria and other diseases.
© Survival International

Survival International has launched a formal complaint about the activities of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) in Cameroon.

This is the first time a conservation organization has been the subject of a complaint to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), using a procedure more normally invoked against multinational corporations.

The complaint charges WWF with involvement in violent abuse and land theft against Baka “Pygmies” in Cameroon, carried out by anti-poaching squads which it in part funds and equips.

Before beginning its work in Cameroon, WWF failed to consider what impact it would hav...

Monday, 08 February

22:08

Progress can kill: shocking photos highlight tribes' health crisis News from Survival International

Warwick Thornton photographed his relatives to bring attention to the appalling health problems affecting Aboriginal communities
Warwick Thornton photographed his relatives to bring attention to the appalling health problems affecting Aboriginal communities
© Warwick Thornton/ Anna Schwartz Gallery (Shanika, 2015 Pigment print on cotton rag art paper 153 × 152cm)

Remarkable photographs by Australian Aboriginal film-maker Warwick Thornton demonstrate the devastating impact “progress” and “development” have had on the health of tribal peoples. They illustrate findings in Survival’s recently published “Progress can kill” report, which revealed horrifying statistics on indigenous health.

Thornton used images of his relatives posing with cans of coke, beer and fast food packaging strapped to them like bombs to stress the terrible diets forced on indigenous people in Australia and in other countries. Poverty and social marginalization have left many dependent...

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